5 Reasons Google Ads Isn’t Working For Your Business

5 Reasons Google Ads Isn’t Working For Your Business

5 Reasons Google Ads Isn’t Working For Your Business

5 Reasons Google Ads Isn’t Working For Your Business

Google Ads can be complicated to learn, optimise and master. If you are part of a small team or a freelancer with no specialist knowledge about how to make Google Ads work for you, it can feel like hitting your head against a brick wall. If you’re the underdog coming in trying to not only figure out how to get Google Ads to work for you, but also compete with competitors who are finding success with Google Ads, it can feel impossible.

But before you throw your hands up in the air and declare that Google Ads “just don’t work for me” take a look through my five reasons Google Ads isn’t working for you, and how to change it.

#1 You Are Focusing on Short Tail Keywords

Just in case you’re a true beginner, a short tail keyword is a search term like “fish food”, whereas a long tail keyword equivalent of this would be “freeze-dried cichlid food”. So, if you’re going straight for the most simple, easy to think of keywords and phrases and these are often too broad and conversion cost too much to see a satisfactory ROI.

The best way to choose keywords is to choose terms that people search for when they are specifically looking for something. So, in the example above, if someone is looking for a specific type of fish food for their specific fish, they aren’t going to want to be bombarded with the thousands of results they’ll get from searching “fish food”. So, if you’re the retailer selling freeze frozen cichlid food you can get far better results if you use long-tail keywords like these, as they cost less and will convert at a higher rate.

This is often where beginners fail because they go straight for the obvious and see no results. You want to go directly to your ideal audience by narrowing the net you cast. 

#2 Throwing Spaghetti at the Wall

Another common problem for new marketers is that they jump into Google Ads, create a few Google recommended campaigns and sit back for weeks or even months to see what works with no real thought to what they’re doing, and then wonder why they aren’t seeing results.

The thing is, setting up and start running Ads online is easy, but doing it well still requires the strategy and thought of any other marketing campaign. Google Ads is great because it makes it easy for small businesses to market to a very specific group of people they otherwise wouldn’t be able to, but the problem is that the ease of it sometimes stops people from taking it seriously until they’ve lost money, by which point they’ve been burned and don’t want to try again.

It’s critical you take your Google Ads campaigns seriously. Spend time before you set up any campaigns to ensure you know your perfect customer inside out, know what terms are being searched for that relates directly to your offer, and what they search for in relation to the problem you solve. When you do set up your campaigns do it thoughtfully and give them a couple of days to settle in before you tweak them.

#3 Your Goals Are Unrealistic for Your Budget and/or Keywords

Often, people new to Google Ads set CTR (click-through-rate) and ROI (return-on-investment) goals way before they actually know what’s possible and when they get disappointing results, they believe Google Ads is a waste of money. You need to make sure you are optimising your campaigns and settings whenever possible and working to keep conversion costs down.

The great thing about Google Ads is that it lets you track your leads and sales directly or through Google Analytics, so you can measure what is working. You should know what kind of return you need from all your sales and understand that one customer if they return to you, will offer you a better ROI though it may not be obvious to you at first glance, so setup conversion tracking properly.

#4 You’re Blaming the Ads Instead of Where They Land

You want everyone who clicks on your ad to convert once on your site. A 100% conversion rate is, likely, impossible, but it’s important to remember that it’s not just the ad doing the hard work.

It’s also the job of whatever page they land on to complete the sale and you should test this page as much as possible to find what works. We often give people a reason to bounce, especially if we’re not sending them directly to a relevant, engaging landing page. If you are bringing a potential customer to a landing page from a specific keyword, consider making several landing pages for the same product to cater to these different pain points. For example, if you sell toys for toddlers and your keywords include “entertaining toys for my toddler” and “toddler birthday present” you can guess that one of your potential customers is a parent looking for a minute for themselves, whereas the other is a family member or friend looking for a gift for a birthday. Your toy fits both purposes, but the needs of the buyer are quite different. You can send them to the same product page or you can create specific landing pages to emphasise how your product solves their problem.

#5 You Forget to Retarget

How often do you buy something the very first time you’re shown it? 1% of the time? Yeah, that’s why retargeting is so so so important. The average Google Ads campaign conversion rate is 0.05-5%. This means the majority of the people who click on your link are going to bounce and go on with their lives.  Retargeting means that we can—in the least creepy way possible—follow them for a time. We can reappear in front of them a certain number of times before we consider that lead truly lost. This means that those people who have just started thinking about how to solve a problem or about a purchase, they will see your brand again repeatedly and are much more likely to buy your product as a solution.

Google Ads is an awesome tool when you take the time to learn how to use it, optimise it, and tweak and test it continuously to get the very best results for your business. The time you put in will increase your CTR and eventually, your bottom line, so don’t give up just yet.

Does it sound like too much work? Read one of my previous article Benefits of Using an Agency to Manage PPC Ads to learn about handing all the work over to the experts. You can also get a free health check by one of our experts today to find out how to build on your online success using Google Ads.

What we do

Click ROI is a Southampton based boutique digital marketing agency specialising in Paid Search and Facebook advertising. Our experienced team with former Facebook and Google employees provide fully managed Pay Per Click services including research, strategy and account creation, landing page development, management and reporting with a focus on your specific business goals and KPIs. Get in touch today, gain an unfair advantage in digital marketing and leverage our experience to maximise your ROI from paid advertising.

Google Ads vs Facebook Ads: Which is better for your business? 

Google Ads vs Facebook Ads: Which is better for your business? 

Google Ads vs Facebook Ads: Which is better for your business? 

While utilising Google Ads and being a success on this platform will contribute to you winning new business, Google Ads is not the only big player out there in terms of paid advertising. Many businesses consider using social media to gain brand awareness and lead generation, with LinkedIn being the top contender in this field.

Facebook, however, can often be last on people’s minds when they think of paid advertising – but why is this? It should come as no surprise to learn that Facebook has recently come under scrutiny for its advertising practices, but this by far doesn’t stop the social media giant from seeing success on its advertising platform, and Facebook can be an extremely powerful tool in which to gain leads and ultimately new customers.

So, Google Ads vs Facebook Ads: which is better for your business?

It comes down to two factors: what your goals are, and who your audience is. It’s really that simple.

Let’s look now at some of the great benefits both platforms offer.

Facebook is technically ‘cheaper’, depending on how large a budget you want to work with. Facebook offers less cost per click, so it’s great for small businesses, those on a tight budget, or if you want to try another stream of activity without having to consider the serious risks associated with cost.

Facebook is different to Google Ads in that it doesn’t require high bidding for a keyword compared to the latter, and keyword quality scores are not relevant. This is mainly because Facebook’s audience segmentation and targeting are very specific compared to Google Ads, so you know exactly who you’re targeting and what content they’ll receive.

Content on Facebook can also be very creative – in fact, it’s encouraged – including videos, animations, and surveys as a form of advertising is extremely attractive for Facebook users, whereas Google Ads are very text-based and require much more impactful calls to action.

The great benefit of Facebook is also dependent on what industry you’re in and who your competition is. Some keywords, for example, require a large amount of bidding even before you start looking at aspects such as quality score and landing pages. If you’re on a limited budget you may find it difficult to compete in the Google Ads space.

Similarly, Facebook users respond well to B2C businesses compared to B2B; content that’s easily shareable will help you go far on Facebook Advertising platform, and because of how the targeting is set up on Facebook you will have a much easier time advertising here if you’re in the B2C industry.

Targeted advertising is great on Facebook – you can select who you want to see your content based on life events (birthdays, graduations), interests (music, hobbies), and specific user aspects, such as age, gender, and location.

Google Ads’ audience targeting is much broader than Facebook – you can only target based on certain parameters, such as location, device used to browse, and the likelihood of revisiting your site. That having said, Google Ads is great for wider targeted audience lists. Display advertising, for example, will repeatedly try to capture visitors after leaving your site, so they’re more likely to come back to your products and services. Display ads can also appear on sites matching your industry, so you’re more likely to attract the right person (great for B2B companies).

Ultimately, to decide which platform is right for you, you should consider what your goals are: is it to generate brand awareness or generate leads? If you want to do both, then it makes sense for you to utilise both platforms. If you’re more interested in generating brand awareness or if you think you have a truly unique offering, Facebook Ads is the place to go. If lead generation is your core business objective, then Google Ads is the platform you’ll find easier to dominate.

The benefit of Google Ads, then, is its wider audience targeting. Businesses can use Google Ads if they’re unsure who their exact audience is or what types of people will be interested in their products and services. Google Ads are also great for expanding into other sectors, such as crossing from B2B to B2C services and vice versa and branching into new vertical markets.

Because of high-hitting calls to action, it’s very easy to be a big contender in the Google Ad space if you have the resources and budget. In addition, if you have the right calls to action and landing pages set up you can quickly convert prospects into buyers, whereas Facebook advertising can be very much about the long game depending on how you use it.

In conclusion, it makes sense to leverage both Google Ads and Facebook Ads to help your business reach its commercial goals. Facebook advertising can feed quite nicely into Google Ads, as more and more people become aware of your brand presence across more than one channel.

Both Google and Facebook have their risks and benefits, but once you achieve the right balance of both, you will quickly see success.

Five points to consider when choosing Google Ads and Facebook Ads

  1. Determine company size and budget – remember that not all large businesses have a large marketing budget, and vice versa – it depends on the structure and goals of the company.
  2. Decide what your main goals are – what do you want to achieve – brand awareness, sales, or a mixture of both?
  3. Think about how you’re positioned in the market – are you going to bid against big competitors or are you unique to your industry?
  4. Target the right people, and help them through the sales funnel – who do you want to buy your products and services? What do you want them to do after they’ve seen or interacted with your content?
  5. And finally, be flexible – digital marketing is ever-moving, and so should you if you want to dominate Google and Facebook Ads.

Whether you choose to advertise on Google or Facebook, or you decide to leverage both, we can help – contact us today for a free health check.

What we do

Click ROI is a Southampton based boutique digital marketing agency specialising in Paid Search and Facebook advertising. Our experienced team with former Facebook and Google employees provide fully managed Pay Per Click services including research, strategy and account creation, landing page development, management and reporting with a focus on your specific business goals and KPIs. Get in touch today, gain an unfair advantage in digital marketing and leverage our experience to maximise your ROI from paid advertising.

Dominate Google Ads with Improved Quality Score

Dominate Google Ads with Improved Quality Score

Dominate Google Ads with Improved Quality Score

Google Ads is all about bidding, right? So, all you need to do to get to the top of the search is bid the highest!

If only it were that easy.

Over the past number of years, Google has become incredibly intuitive when it comes to user experience. Bidding more for a keyword will place your ad higher than your competitor, but Google also places relevance on your keywords – use them incorrectly, and you’ll quickly see costly ads and little conversions.

This is where keyword quality score comes in, and why it’s so important.

As a rule, the lower your keyword quality score the more you will pay for them. But this doesn’t mean that you’ll still rank highly – quality score is a direct factor to your ad rank, and if it’s lower than Google likes it to be then your ads could be placed lower in search – or not show at all.

Quality score is also indicative of your conversion rate. While it doesn’t directly affect your conversions if your keywords, ad copy and landing pages are not relevant to the user you’re not likely to convert them into a customer.

So how can you increase your quality score?

Start with keyword research

Keyword research is often cited as a ‘must-do’ action because it’s very important. What keywords you use need to be relevant to your products and services, as well as appearing in copy naturally to increase conversions.

Use a combination of long tail, broad, phrase and exact match keywords to optimise your ads successfully. Don’t use highly searched keywords that don’t reflect what you offer – this will drastically reduce your quality score and cost you more over time.

Don’t be tempted to pick keywords with a high search volume – these will no doubt have high benchmarks for bids, and as they’re likely to be broad search terms (e.g. dogs vs dog kennels in London), you’ll see a lot of irrelevant traffic, which is very costly and renders your ads ineffective.

Negative keywords are just as important!

Don’t forget negative keywords, they’re just as important as your relevant ones. Negative keywords can seriously harm your account if you don’t keep on top of them, pulling your quality score and keyword ranking down.

Pay attention to your broad and phrase match keywords to determine if they receive a high number of clicks from irrelevant search terms. If your landing page content doesn’t show what the user is looking for they will bounce from your page, making Google will see this as a red flag and start to bring your quality score down.

Optimise your ad copy

You only have a limited number of characters for your ad copy, so try to include your entire keyword and preferably at the beginning of your copy if you can (but don’t compromise on creativity or user experience!). If you have a call to action on your landing page, such as a free trial, you can offer it in your ad copy too, so your visitors know what their next step is going to be.

Don’t forget that ad copy should never be left dormant for very long – analyse it on a regular basis and tweak to get the best performance out of your ads. Keywords and their search volumes do shift often, so you may find you need to refine these within your copy to stay relevant and keep your keyword quality score high.

Optimise your landing pages

Often companies focus their attention on Google Ads and narrow their focus to ad copy, bidding, and keyword research.

Optimising your landing pages happens outside of the Google Ads platform, so it can be easy to dismiss these as a secondary or “nice to have” feature – some businesses might even be linking all their ads to just their homepage! Which is a recipe for disaster and only costs more time and money to rectify.

Landing page copy is trickier than your ad copy. You have a lot more freedom to write content, but this can lay the path for riskier SEO and PPC practices, such as keyword stuffing.

You only need to have your URL, H1 and body copy with your keyword, so don’t be tempted to include it in every paragraph. Remember that conversions happen because your visitor likes what they see on your page and not just because the keyword they use appears everywhere.

Once you’ve created your landing page look at it from a user’s point of view – have an external viewer look over it if necessary – and ensure that every touch point, from ad copy to the final conversion action, such as contacting you, is relevant, clear, concise and interesting.

Pay close attention to every part of Google Ads

You can have outstanding landing pages, call to actions, and creative ad copy that reads excellently. You can even have fantastic keywords that gain a lot of clicks, but all of this is irrelevant if your keyword quality score is low.

You’ll pay a lot more for keywords with a low quality score if there’s no connection between them and your URLs and landing pages. You’ll likely find that your landing page bounce rates are high, and your conversions low.

Ad copy, keywords, URLs and landing pages all need to fit nicely together and have consistency throughout to be successful.

And finally, the keyword quality score is about price – having a high score means you pay less per click, so it really is beneficial to optimise your keywords and landing pages.

Your quick start guide to dominating ads:

  • Research keywords relevant to your brand. Use a mix of broad, phrase, and exact match, ensuring you focus on both short and long tail terms
  • Incorporate them into your ad creatively – they shouldn’t feel forced
  • Optimise your landing pages with your keywords – you may need to create new landing pages
  • Analyse your work and continue to focus on optimising your ads to ensure success!

Get a free health check from one of our experts and get started with improving your keyword quality score today.

What we do

Click ROI is a Southampton based boutique digital marketing agency specialising in Paid Search and Facebook advertising. Our experienced team with former Facebook and Google employees provide fully managed Pay Per Click services including research, strategy and account creation, landing page development, management and reporting with a focus on your specific business goals and KPIs. Get in touch today, gain an unfair advantage in digital marketing and leverage our experience to maximise your ROI from paid advertising.

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